Quality improvement in surgery combining lean improvement methods with teamwork training: a controlled before-after study

October 28, 2015

Source:  PLOS ONE 10/9 e0138490

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study investigated the effectiveness of combining teamwork training and lean process improvement, two distinct approaches to improving surgical safety. A controlled interrupted time series study was conducted in a specialist UK Orthopaedic hospital incorporating a plastic surgery team (which received the intervention) and an Orthopaedic theatre team acting as a control. The study found that combining teamwork training and systems improvement enhanced both technical and non-technical operating team process measures, and were associated with a trend to better safety outcome measures in a controlled study comparison. The authors suggest that approaches which address both system and culture dimensions of safety may prove valuable in reducing risks to patients.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


An immersive “simulation week” enhances clinical performance of incoming surgical interns improved performance persists at 6 months follow-up

May 22, 2015

Source:  Surgery 157/3 pp. 432-43

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Date of publication:  March 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to develop, pilot, and evaluate clinical performance after an immersive simulation course for incoming interns. Graduating students were recruited for a 1-week immersive simulation course. Controls received no simulation training. Primary outcome was clinical performance on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) of clinical procedures and surgical technical skills. The immersive simulation course objectively improved subjects’ clinical skills, technical skills, and confidence. Despite similar clinical experience as controls, the intervention group’s improved performance persisted at 6 months follow-up. This intervention could reduce errors and enhance patient safety.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Cutting medical training by years could harm patient safety, doctors warn

February 20, 2015

Source:  The Telegraph 30 January 2015

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: According to leading doctors’ groups, proposals to shorten medical training could seriously compromise patients’ safety. Plans outlined in an independent review included shortening consultant training from between eight to 10 years to between six to eight years. Junior doctors would become fully registered immediately after completing medical school, but would then spend four to six years in broad-based speciality training. The BMA has called on the government to “pause” such policy development whilst safety concerns are addressed and the changes are piloted in small studies.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


New standards put patient safety at the heart of medical education and training

February 20, 2015

Source: General Medical Council

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  The General Medical Council (GMC) has launched a consultation on new standards which will create a single set of standards for organisations delivering medical education and training across the UK. The standards are designed to make sure that fairness and patients’ safety, experience and quality of care lie at the core of teaching and training. The standards would include a requirement for organisations to promote and encourage a culture that reflects on and learns from mistakes, incidents and near misses. The consultation closes on 24 March 2015.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Patients as teachers: a randomised controlled trial on the use of personal stories of harm to raise awareness of patient safety for doctors in training

October 1, 2014

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to measure the impact of patient narratives used to train junior doctors in patient safety. A trial was conducted in the North Yorkshire East Coast Foundation School (NYECFS). The intervention consisted of 1-h-long patient narratives followed by discussion. The Attitude to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) were used to measure the impact of the intervention. The authors state that involving patients with experiences of safety incidents in training has an ideological appeal and seems an obvious choice in designing safety interventions, but that they were unable to demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention in changing general attitudes to safety compared to control.

Length of Publication:   Unknown

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Health Education England announces new Board on safety led by Professor Norman Williams

October 1, 2014

Source:  Health Education England

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Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: A new programme to ensure that patient safety is at the heart of how the health and healthcare workforce are trained has been announced by Health Education England (HEE). Patient safety should be the first and most important lesson healthcare workers learn as they train to work in the NHS. HEE has asked recent past President of the Royal College of Surgeons Professor Norman Williams to chair the new initiative with Sir Keith Pearson, Chair of HEE acting as Vice Chair. The HEE Safety Board will start its work later this year and will look to report in the autumn of 2015.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Engaging senior doctors in patient safety training

August 29, 2013

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  July 2013

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  In an article entitled, “Building capacity and capability for patient safety education: a train-the-trainers programme for senior doctors”, the authors explore engaging senior doctors in patient safety training, as both teachers and learners. There have been calls for patient safety to be included in the learning of all healthcare workers and senior clinicians are a key audience for this learning. Patient safety is a relatively new discipline so many senior clinicians have not been exposed to it as part of their training, but they could be used as an ‘expert faculty’ to drive and support the teaching of patient safety among all healthcare workers.

Length of Publication:  1 web page