Staff and public urged to help shape new patient safety body

December 23, 2015

Source:  NHS Networks

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Date of publication:  November 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  NHS staff, patients and members of the public are being urged to have their say on the shape of a new national patient safety organisation.

The health secretary announced in the summer that he would create an independent function to oversee the investigation of patient safety incidents.  An expert advisory group has been established to collect evidence and make recommendations on the roles and responsibilities of the new body, ahead of its formation in April 2016.

An online survey to capture the views of patients and professionals can be found at www.surveymonkey.com/r/ipsis2015

Length of publication:   1 webpage


Patient safety incident reporting continues to improve

October 1, 2014

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  September 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: The publication of six-monthly data on patient safety incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) between 1 October 2013 and 30 April 2014 shows the NHS is continuing to get better at recognising and reporting patient safety incidents. The increase in the level of reported incidents shows that the NHS is continuing to be more open and transparent about reporting patient safety incidents. Incident reporting is important at a local level because it allows clinicians to learn about why patient safety incidents happen within their own service and organisation, and what they can do to keep their patients safe from avoidable harm.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Six-monthly patient safety incident data shows incident reporting in the NHS continues to improve

May 28, 2014

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  May 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Six-monthly data on patient safety incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) has been published from between 1 April and 30 September 2013. According to the data, the NHS is continuing to get better at recognising and reporting patient safety incidents. The new data shows an increase of 8.9% in the number of incidents reported compared to the same period in the previous year, as the NHS continues to be more open and transparent around patient safety incident reporting. It will enable NHS England to identify and take action to prevent emerging patterns of incidents on a national level via patient safety alerts. Locally incident reporting enables clinicians to learn from their own and others’ services about why patient safety incidents happen and they can then act to prevent their own patients being placed at similar risks.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


The contribution of nurses to incident disclosure: a narrative review

March 26, 2014

Source:  International Journal of Nursing Studies 51/2 pp.334-345

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Reviewers from England explored how nurses feel about disclosing patient safety incidents to patients and if there are any barriers to disclosure. The findings suggested that nurses have a key role in supporting doctors when disclosing incidents to patients, but that they may not be well prepared to disclose incidents to patients independently. Barriers to nurse involvement in incident disclosure included few opportunities for training and many conflicting roles within nursing. Nurses may have a greater role to play in safety incident error disclosure to patients, but they need better training and support to enable them to do this.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Six-monthly patient safety incident data published

October 30, 2013

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  September 2013

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  The publication of 6-monthly data on patient safety incidents has been welcomed by NHS England. All incidents in which any patient could have been harmed or has suffered any level of harm, are reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) by acute hospitals, mental health services, community trusts, ambulance services and primary care organisations.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Developing a patient measure of safety (PMOS)

August 29, 2013

Source:  BMJ Quality and Safety vol./iss 22/7 pp. 554-562

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Date of publication:  July 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In high-risk industries, tools that can identify factors that contribute to accidents have been developed. Patients provide feedback on their experience of care in hospitals, but there are no existing measures asking patients to comment on issues that can lead to patient safety incidents. This study aimed to define  contributory factors from the Yorkshire Contributory Factors Framework (YCFF) that patients are able to identify in a hospital setting and to use this information to develop a patient measure of safety (PMOS). The draft PMOS worked well and showed that patients are able to identify factors which contribute to the safety of their care.

Length of Publication:  9 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


NPSA publishes patient safety incident data update.

February 8, 2012

Source:  National Patient Safety Agency

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Date of publicationDecember 2011

Publication type:  Report

In a nutshell:  A recently published report of all the patient safety incidences reported by NHS organisations in England and Wales, to the NPSA, up to June 2011.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Acknowledgements:  National Electronic Library for Medicine

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library