The daily relationships between staffing, safety perceptions and personality in hospital nursing: a longitudinal on-line diary study

March 23, 2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Studies 59 pp. 27–37

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The association between poor staffing conditions and negative patient safety consequences is well established within hospital nursing. However, many studies have been limited to nurse population level associations, and have used routine data to examine relationships. As a result, it is less clear how these relationships might be manifested at the individual nurse level on a day-to-day basis. Furthermore, personality may have direct and moderating roles in terms of work environment and patient safety associations, but limited research has explored personality in this context.

The findings elucidate the potential mechanisms by which patient safety risks arise within hospital nursing, and suggest that nurses may not respond to staffing conditions in the same way, dependent upon personality. Further understanding of these relationships will enable staff to be supported in terms of work environment conditions on an individual basis.

Length of publication:  11 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 

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Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study

February 24, 2016

Source:  BMJ Open 6/e008751 pp. 1-7

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing.

Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered.

Length of publication:  7 pages


Factors contributing to registered nurse medication administration error: a narrative review

February 20, 2015

Source:  International Journal of Nursing Studies 52/1 pp. 403-20

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The authors explored the factors contributing to medication administration incidents amongst registered nurses. A number of factors, including the environment and characteristics of the nurse, were found to influence medication administration incidents. In terms of environment, clinical workload and work setting were important. In terms of nurse characteristics, nurses’ lived experience of work and their demographics were significant. More studies have focused on environmental issues than on how personal characteristics may contribute to incidents. Any inter-relationship between factors was not explored.

Length of Publication:  17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Nurses’ shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety

October 29, 2014

Source:  Medical Care 52/ 11 pp.975-81.

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Date of publication:  September 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article aimed to describe shift patterns of European nurses and to investigate whether shift length and working overtime is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. The authors concluded that European registered nurses working shifts of ≥12 hours and those working overtime reported lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Any policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to help with staffing shortages or increase flexibility also incurs additional risk to quality.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


BMJ Quality & Safety: a collection of key articles

April 30, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  This page links to a special collection of the best articles published in BMJ Quality & Safety in 2013. The BMJ Quality and Safety journal is co-owned by the Health Foundation and the BMJ Group. The articles featured in this collection include: identification of doctors at risk of recurrent complaints: a national study of healthcare complaints in Australia; the global burden of unsafe medical care: analytic modelling of observational studies; systematic review of the application of the plan–do–study–act method to improve quality in healthcare; ‘care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care; culture and behaviour in the English National Health Service: overview of lessons from a large multimethod study.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Guidelines for routine gastrostomy tube replacement in children

March 26, 2014

Source:  Nursing Children and Young People 25/10 pp. 22-25

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Date of publicationDecember 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:   The safest method of inserting a gastrostomy in children that require full or supplemental enteral feeding for more than six weeks is by endoscopic placement. The device can be changed to a balloon, button or non-balloon type once a stoma tract has formed successfully following initial placement of a gastrostomy tube. Community nursing teams often support children with gastrostomies and their families. The National Nurses Nutrition Group, the Patient Safety Agency and manufacturers have produced guidance for the safe insertion and replacement of balloon and button gastrostomies, but standardised national guidelines are needed.

Length of Publication:  4 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The contribution of nurses to incident disclosure: a narrative review

March 26, 2014

Source:  International Journal of Nursing Studies 51/2 pp.334-345

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Reviewers from England explored how nurses feel about disclosing patient safety incidents to patients and if there are any barriers to disclosure. The findings suggested that nurses have a key role in supporting doctors when disclosing incidents to patients, but that they may not be well prepared to disclose incidents to patients independently. Barriers to nurse involvement in incident disclosure included few opportunities for training and many conflicting roles within nursing. Nurses may have a greater role to play in safety incident error disclosure to patients, but they need better training and support to enable them to do this.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.