The daily relationships between staffing, safety perceptions and personality in hospital nursing: a longitudinal on-line diary study

March 23, 2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Studies 59 pp. 27–37

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The association between poor staffing conditions and negative patient safety consequences is well established within hospital nursing. However, many studies have been limited to nurse population level associations, and have used routine data to examine relationships. As a result, it is less clear how these relationships might be manifested at the individual nurse level on a day-to-day basis. Furthermore, personality may have direct and moderating roles in terms of work environment and patient safety associations, but limited research has explored personality in this context.

The findings elucidate the potential mechanisms by which patient safety risks arise within hospital nursing, and suggest that nurses may not respond to staffing conditions in the same way, dependent upon personality. Further understanding of these relationships will enable staff to be supported in terms of work environment conditions on an individual basis.

Length of publication:  11 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 

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Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study

February 24, 2016

Source:  BMJ Open 6/e008751 pp. 1-7

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing.

Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered.

Length of publication:  7 pages


Staffing and resource adequacy strongly related to RNs’ assessment of patient safety: a national study of RNs working in acute-care hospitals in Sweden

November 27, 2013

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety 2013 Oct 14. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  October 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study sought to provide evidence on how registered nurses (RNs) assess the safety of patient care at their workplace and how factors in RNs’ work environment are related to their assessments. Previous research has emphasised patient-to-nurse ratios in strengthening patient safety practices and this study complements this by emphasising RNs’ own perception of having enough staff and resources to provide quality nursing care.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Nurse staffing effects on patient outcomes: safety-net and non safety-net

June 28, 2011

Source: Medical care Vol49, Issue 4, p406-414

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Date of publication: April 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article looks at the levels of nurse staffing, and whether greater levels of nursing staff available increase patient safety.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: HMIC