Improved safety culture and teamwork climate are associated with decreases in patient harm and hospital mortality across a hospital system

February 24, 2016

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Improved safety and teamwork culture has been associated with decreased patient harm within specific units in hospitals or hospital groups. Most studies have focused on a specific harm type. This study’s objective was to document such an association across an entire hospital system and across multiple harm types.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

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Registered nurse, healthcare support worker, medical staffing levels and mortality in English hospital trusts: a cross-sectional study

February 24, 2016

Source:  BMJ Open 6/e008751 pp. 1-7

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  To examine associations between mortality and registered nurse (RN) staffing in English hospital trusts taking account of medical and healthcare support worker (HCSW) staffing.

Ward-based RN staffing is significantly associated with reduced mortality for medical patients. There is little evidence for beneficial associations with HCSW staffing. Higher doctor staffing levels is associated with reduced mortality. The estimated association between RN staffing and mortality changes when medical and HCSW staffing is considered and depending on whether ward or trust wide staffing levels are considered.

Length of publication:  7 pages


Effect of the World Health Organization checklist on patient outcomes: a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial

June 24, 2015

Source:  Annals of Surgery 261/5 pp. 821-8

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Date of publicationMay 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: There have been reports of reductions of morbidity and mortality after implementation of the World Health Organization’s Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) in pre-/post designed studies without controls. The authors of this study report a randomized controlled trial of the SSC. They concluded that implementation of the WHO SSC was associated with robust reduction in morbidity and length of in-hospital stay and some reduction in mortality.

Length of Publication:  8 pages


Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of the World Health Organization surgical safety checklist on postoperative complications

April 30, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Surgery 101/3 pp. 150-8

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:   This systematic review evaluated current evidence regarding the effectiveness of the World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist (SSC) in reducing postoperative complications. A meta‐analysis was conducted to quantify the effect of the WHO SSC on any complication, surgical‐site infection (SSI) and mortality. There was a strong correlation between a significant decrease in postoperative complications and adherence to aspects of care embedded in the checklist. The evidence suggested a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality following implementation of the WHO SSC, but this cannot be regarded as definitive in the absence of high quality studies.

Length of Publication:  9 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


How can we keep patients with dementia safe in our acute hospitals? A review of challenges and solutions

November 27, 2013

Source:  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine vol/iss 106/9, pp. 355-61

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Date of publication:  September 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This review examined the medical literature over the last ten years for aspects of patient safety related to patients with dementia. Patients with dementia suffer frequent adverse events in hospital that result in falls, delirium and loss of function which can lead to increased length of stay and higher levels of mortality. Inadequate assessment and treatment, discrimination, low staff levels and lack of staff training can add to the situation. The authors say that there is no one solution, but a multifactorial, multilevel approach is needed at seven levels of care – patient, task, staff, team, environment, organisation and institution.

Length of Publication:  7 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The surgical safety checklist survey: a national perspective on patient safety

June 24, 2013

Source:  Irish Journal of Medical Science Vol/iss 182/2 pp. 171-176

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Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The World Health Organisation recommended practices to ensure the safety of patients worldwide in 2008. This led to the development of the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) which Ireland has endorsed. The authors aimed to determine whether the SSC is being implemented and to identify problems associated with its introduction and on-going implementation. They found that it has not been implemented throughout all operating departments in Ireland, but where it has been introduced there has been a perceived positive change in safety culture. The authors state that a formal audit of morbidity and mortality is required.

Length of Publication:  6 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Towards National Surgical Surveillance in the UK – A Pilot Study.

January 30, 2013

Source:  PLoS ONE, vol/iss 7/12 pp.e47969

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Date of publication:  December 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Six standardised metrics for assessing the quality and safety of surgery have been proposed by the World Health Organisation. This study collected these metrics for the period 2005-2009 from a sample of 30 hospitals in England. The aim was to examine the feasibility and usefulness of measuring surgical performance and any impact on public health and mortality. The study found that standardised surgical metrics are practicable to collect and may help policy makers and commissioners understand variations in quality.

Length of Publication:  1 web page