Safety standards for invasive procedures: beware the implementation gap

March 23, 2016

Source:  BMJ 352:i1121

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Nick Sevdalis is professor of implementation science and patient safety at King’s College London.  In this editorial he offers advice regarding the implementation of the recent NHS England guideline National Safety Standards for Invasive Procedures (NatSSIPs).  

Length of publication:  2 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

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Improved safety culture and teamwork climate are associated with decreases in patient harm and hospital mortality across a hospital system

February 24, 2016

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Improved safety and teamwork culture has been associated with decreased patient harm within specific units in hospitals or hospital groups. Most studies have focused on a specific harm type. This study’s objective was to document such an association across an entire hospital system and across multiple harm types.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Evaluating the effect of safety culture on error reporting: a comparison of managerial and staff perspectives

December 23, 2015

Source:  American Journal of Medical Quality 30/6 pp. 550-8

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Date of publication:  November 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Although medical error reporting has been studied, under-reporting remains pervasive. The study aims were to identify the organisational factors with the greatest perceived effect on error reporting and to determine whether associations differ for management and clinical staff.

Error feedback was perceived as the most significant predictor, while organisational learning was another significant factor. It also was found that although management support for patient safety was significantly related to error reporting among clinical staff, this association was not significant among management. This difference is relevant because managers may not be aware that their failure to demonstrate support for safety leads to underreporting by frontline clinical staff. Findings from this study can inform hospitals’ efforts to increase error reporting.

Length of publication:  9 pages


Quality management and perceptions of teamwork and safety climate in European hospitals

November 25, 2015

Source: International Journal for Quality in Healthcare [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to investigate the associations of quality management systems with teamwork and safety climate, and to describe and compare differences in perceptions of teamwork climate and safety climate among clinical leaders and frontline clinicians.

Length of Publication:   Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


A realist analysis of hospital patient safety in Wales: applied learning for alternative contexts from a multisite case study

October 28, 2015

Source:  Health Services and Delivery Research 3/40

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Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study was designed to address gaps in conceptual, methodological and empirical knowledge about the influence of context on the local implementation of patient safety programmes.  The findings show how local implementation of patient safety interventions are impacted and modified by particular aspects of context.  Heightened awareness of the influence of context on the local implementation of patient safety programmes is required to inform the design of such interventions and to ensure their effective implementation and operationalisation in the day-to-day practice of health-care teams.

Length of Publication:  242 pages


Five top tips for using safety culture surveys

August 27, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: The importance of safety culture in the NHS is a big issue. The Health Foundation spoke to people using safety culture surveys on the front line to try to understand and improve local safety culture. Their experiences and top tips are highlighted on this web page. It was concluded that safety culture surveys are helpful for understanding how safety is perceived, for measuring the impact of an intervention, or as an intervention in their own right.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Using safety cases in industry and healthcare

December 24, 2012

Source: The Health Foundation

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Date of publication: December 2012

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: The results of a study that reviewed the use of safety cases in six safety-critical industries, as well as the emerging use of safety cases in healthcare are presented in this report. The study aimed to describe safety case use in other industries, to make pragmatic recommendations for the adoption of safety cases in healthcare and to outline possible healthcare application scenarios.

Length of publication: 1 web page