Workplace training for senior trainees: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of current approaches to promote patient safety

August 26, 2015

Source:  Postgraduate Medical Journal [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors of this review say that developing patient safety skills and knowledge among advanced trainee doctors is essential. They aimed to establish the use of clinical supervision and other workplace training to develop non-technical patient safety competency in advanced trainee doctors. The findings showed that clinical supervision is not identified as an avenue for embedding patient safety skills in the workplace and is therefore not evaluated as a method to teach trainees these skills. Workplace training in non-technical patient safety skills is limited, but one-off training courses are sometimes used. It is of utmost importance to support supervisors to identify teaching moments during supervision and to give weight to non-technical skills and technical skills equally.

Length of Publication:  11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Effectiveness of interventions to improve patient handover in surgery: A systematic review

June 24, 2015

Source:  Surgery 158/1 pp. 85-95

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Date of publication:  May 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors of this study examined interventions to improve handover in surgery. The interventions included paper and computerised checklists, forms and standardised operating protocols for handover. All studies found some degree of improvement in handover processes. Checklists or forms can be used to improve information transfer during surgery handovers. The process of implementation is poorly described in the literature however.

Length of Publication:  11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Do large-scale hospital- and system-wide interventions improve patient outcomes: a systematic review

October 29, 2014

Source:  BMC Health Services Research 14/1 pp.369

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Date of publication:  September 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The authors of this review assessed the impact of hospital and system-wide interventions to improve patient safety. Studies which measured outcomes two years after implementation or more were more likely to show improved outcomes. It was difficult to assess the impact of organisational culture or other determinants. Effective leadership and clinical champions, adequate financial and educational resources and dedicated promotional activities may have a significant impact.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Reducing the burden of surgical harm: a systematic review of the interventions used to reduce adverse events in surgery

May 28, 2014

Source:  Annals of Surgery 259/4 pp. 630-41

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors completed a systematic review of interventions used to reduce adverse events in surgery. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to measure the quality of observational studies and RCTs were assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias. Effective process interventions were submission of outcome data to national audit, use of safety checklists, and adherence to a care pathway. Certain safety technology significantly reduced harm, and team training had a positive effect on patient outcome. The conclusion was that only a small cohort of medium- to high-quality interventions effectively reduce surgical harm and are feasible to implement.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of the World Health Organization surgical safety checklist on postoperative complications

April 30, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Surgery 101/3 pp. 150-8

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:   This systematic review evaluated current evidence regarding the effectiveness of the World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist (SSC) in reducing postoperative complications. A meta‐analysis was conducted to quantify the effect of the WHO SSC on any complication, surgical‐site infection (SSI) and mortality. There was a strong correlation between a significant decrease in postoperative complications and adherence to aspects of care embedded in the checklist. The evidence suggested a reduction in postoperative complications and mortality following implementation of the WHO SSC, but this cannot be regarded as definitive in the absence of high quality studies.

Length of Publication:  9 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Do safety checklists improve teamwork and communication in the operating room? A systematic review

January 29, 2014

Source:  Annals of Surgery vol/iss 258/6 pp. 856–871

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Date of publication:  December 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This systematic review aimed to assess the impact of surgical safety checklists on the quality of teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). The methods for assessing teamwork and communication included surveys, observations, interviews, and 360° assessments. The evidence suggests that safety checklists can improve the quality of OR teamwork and communication, however, when used incorrectly or when individuals do not believe in the process, checklists may have a negative impact on the function of the team. Overall, safety checklists are beneficial for OR teamwork and communication and this may be one device through which patient outcomes are improved.

Length of Publication:  16 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Treatment-Related Mortality With Bevacizumab in Cancer Patients

April 4, 2011

Source: JAMA

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Date of publication: 02 February 2011

Publication type: Systematic review

In a nutshell:  This review incorporates a randomized control trial and to look at the risk of fatal adverse events associated with the use of Bevacizumab during chemotherapy.  The findings indicate that there is an increased likelihood of fatal adverse events for patients being treated with the drug. 

Length of publication: 7 web pages

Some important information:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement:National Electronic Library for Medicines (NELM)