Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment

March 23, 2016

Source: British Journal of Nursing 25/3

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians’ attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Advertisements

Developing person-centred analysis of harm in a paediatric hospital: a quality improvement report

May 22, 2015

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety 24/5 pp. 337-44

Follow this link for item

Date of publicationMay 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: Staff at Great Ormond Street Hospital developed and tested a tool specifically designed for patients and families to report harm. Processes to report harm were developed over a 10-month period. The tool was tested in different formats and it moved from a provider centric to a person-centred tool analysed in real time. Feedback to staff provided learning opportunities. Improvements in culture climate and staff reporting were noted in the short term. The integration of patient involvement in safety monitoring systems is vital to achieve safety. The testing and introduction of a self-reporting, real-time bedside tool has led to active engagement with families and patients and raised awareness.

Length of Publication:  8 pages


Predictors of health care professionals’ attitudes towards involvement in safety-relevant behaviours

September 25, 2013

Source:  Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  August 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study examined factors that influence health professionals’ attitudes towards patient participation in patient safety activities. Doctors and nurses from four hospitals in England were surveyed about their attitudes towards patient involvement in two error scenarios regarding hand hygiene and medication safety. Professionals were more in favour of patients intervening about a medication error than about hand hygiene. If a professional hypothetically responded negatively to a patient when they pointed out a potential error, staff thought that this could have a negative effect on the patient-professional relationship. Doctors were less likely than nurses to think it was good for patients to intervene.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Involving patients in improving safety.

February 25, 2013

Source: The Health Foundation

Follow this link for item

Date of publication:  January 2013

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: An evidence scan from the Health Foundation which describes ways that patients have been involved in improving safety. It argues that patients can help to safeguard their own wellbeing and promote change.

Length of publication: 26 pages


A qualitative exploration of patients’ attitudes towards the ‘Participate Inform Notice Know’ (PINK) patient safety video

December 24, 2012

Source:  International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Advance access doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzs073

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  November 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors looked at the PINK (‘Participate Inform Notice Know’) video, an educational tool designed to increase hospital patients’ involvement in patient safety activities. Interviews with patients from one hospital found that people responded well to the short video, that it raised their awareness about patient safety and encouraged them to be more involved in their hospital care. It was thought that the video could be improved by tailoring it more to the individual circumstances of patients and by including a wider range of content.

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Engaging patients as vigilant partners in safety: a systematic review

July 22, 2010

SourceMedical Care Research and Review.  Vol 67(2)  pp 119-149

Date of publication:  April 2010

Publication type:  Systematic Review

In a nutshell:  The article is a systematic review which looks a the feasibility and effectivess of the initiatives being used to prevent errors by promoting patient involvement .   21 studies were used in this review as they fulfilled the inclusion criteria used.

The study looks at the feasibility and effectiveness of the initiatives being used to prevent errors by promoting patient involvement. The results indicate that patients display positive attitudes towards engaging in their safety but their level of involvement varies. The perceived effectiveness of actions, self-efficacy, behavioural control beliefs, prevention of incidents are key issues for patients’ intenting to engage in their safety.

Length of publication:  29 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements:  EMBASE