Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 5 Issue 5

May 28, 2014

Dispensing good advice to bridge the gap in patient safety

May 28, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: The Health Foundation has awarded The Scottish Patient Safety Programme (SPSP) in Primary Care, which is run by Healthcare Improvement Scotland, funding of £450,000 over two years to run an improvement collaborative to enhance communications between GPs and pharmacists working in primary care.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Review of non-medical prescribing among acute and community staff

May 28, 2014

Source:  Nursing Management 20/10 pp. 22-6

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Employers of non-medical prescribers (NMPs) have a duty to ensure that they remain competent and current through access to relevant continuing professional development as identified in staff appraisals. A survey was undertaken to evaluate non-medical prescribing in a trust that operates an acute district hospital and community services. There were five main themes from the results: prescribing activity, patient safety, effect of non-medical prescribing on care, workforce planning and organisational support. The findings suggested that most NMPs surveyed were compliant with local and national policy and that non-compliance was solved through intervention by line managers.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Six-monthly patient safety incident data shows incident reporting in the NHS continues to improve

May 28, 2014

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  May 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Six-monthly data on patient safety incidents reported to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) has been published from between 1 April and 30 September 2013. According to the data, the NHS is continuing to get better at recognising and reporting patient safety incidents. The new data shows an increase of 8.9% in the number of incidents reported compared to the same period in the previous year, as the NHS continues to be more open and transparent around patient safety incident reporting. It will enable NHS England to identify and take action to prevent emerging patterns of incidents on a national level via patient safety alerts. Locally incident reporting enables clinicians to learn from their own and others’ services about why patient safety incidents happen and they can then act to prevent their own patients being placed at similar risks.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Patient Safety Academy website goes live

May 28, 2014

Source:  Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: This news page from the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences at the University of Oxford, discusses a new Patient Safety Academy website that has been established by a research group, the Quality, Reliability, Safety and Teamwork Unit (QRSTU). The QRSTU team set up the website with the aim of providing education and support to healthcare professionals in the application of human factors to their work settings to improve quality and safety. The website can be accessed at http://www.patientsafetyacademy.co.uk/

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Reducing the burden of surgical harm: a systematic review of the interventions used to reduce adverse events in surgery

May 28, 2014

Source:  Annals of Surgery 259/4 pp. 630-41

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors completed a systematic review of interventions used to reduce adverse events in surgery. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to measure the quality of observational studies and RCTs were assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for assessing risk of bias. Effective process interventions were submission of outcome data to national audit, use of safety checklists, and adherence to a care pathway. Certain safety technology significantly reduced harm, and team training had a positive effect on patient outcome. The conclusion was that only a small cohort of medium- to high-quality interventions effectively reduce surgical harm and are feasible to implement.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Implementing the Safety Thermometer tool in one NHS trust

May 28, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 13-26 23/5 pp. 268-72

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Date of publication:  March 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The NHS in England introduced the NHS Safety Thermometer to address measurement of patient safety using the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme. This article discusses the CQUIN scheme and the thinking behind the focus on pressure ulcers, falls in care, catheter use and urinary tract infection, and venous thromboembolism. The implementation of the scheme in a large NHS foundation trust is described together with its effect within the authors’ organisation on harm-free care for their patients.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.