How to make medication error reporting systems work – Factors associated with their successful development and implementation

September 30, 2015

Source:  Health Policy 119/8 pp. 1046-54.

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  August 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study explored medication error reporting (MER) systems in different healthcare contexts. Sixteen medication safety experts in sixteen countries responded to a descriptive online questionnaire. Several factors related to the national context of MER systems, i.e., the operational environment, were identified to impact successful development and implementation of these systems. The authors concluded that operational environments of MER systems must be constructed to support functionality of these systems, and need to be improved in many countries.

Length of Publication:  9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


A simple flashcard: big impact for junior doctors!

November 26, 2014

Source:  The Clinical Teacher 11/6 pp. 454-60.

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  October 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Reducing prescribing errors is crucial for ensuring patient safety. Many studies have reported that foundation-year doctors (FYs) have been found to be major contributors to prescribing errors; however, few studies have introduced meaningful interventions. Questionnaires were sent to FY2s to find the 15 most commonly prescribed medications on call. The medications and instructions were incorporated into a flashcard that was disseminated to new FY1s at a hospital in the UK. The FY1s were asked to complete a pre- and post-flashcard questionnaire, giving instructions for 10 medications and their confidence in prescribing these medications. A control group at another hospital were given the same questionnaires, but not the flashcard. No significant difference in confidence was seen in FY1s at either hospital before the flashcard was issued. At week 4, 93% of FY1s still used the flashcard 2.2 times per day, claiming that it saved time on call. The authors say they have introduced an inexpensive and simple prescribing aid, which has been statistically shown to improve prescribing confidence in FY1s.

Length of Publication:  7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Patients as teachers: a randomised controlled trial on the use of personal stories of harm to raise awareness of patient safety for doctors in training

October 1, 2014

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to measure the impact of patient narratives used to train junior doctors in patient safety. A trial was conducted in the North Yorkshire East Coast Foundation School (NYECFS). The intervention consisted of 1-h-long patient narratives followed by discussion. The Attitude to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) were used to measure the impact of the intervention. The authors state that involving patients with experiences of safety incidents in training has an ideological appeal and seems an obvious choice in designing safety interventions, but that they were unable to demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention in changing general attitudes to safety compared to control.

Length of Publication:   Unknown

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study

August 27, 2014

Source:  BMC Health Services Research 14/1 pp. 296

Follow this link for item

Date of publication:  July 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This Swedish study aimed to describe the patient safety culture in an emergency department at two different hospitals before and after a lean quality improvement (QI) project, which aimed to enhance patient safety. Staff completed a questionnaire before and after the intervention. The intervention was associated with improved perceptions of teamwork within both hospitals and across hospital units at one hospital. One of the hospitals also had improved perceptions of communication openness. Physicians were more likely to perceive the changes than other staff.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Patient safety climate and worker safety behaviours in acute hospitals in Scotland

July 31, 2013

Source:  J Safety Res. Vol 45 pp.95-101

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study explored staff perceptions of safety climate in six NHS hospitals in Scotland and tested whether safety climate was associated with staff safety behaviours and patient and staff injuries. Clinical staff completed the ‘Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire’. Hospital safety climate scores were strongly linked to staff safety behaviour. There were also links with patient and staff injury rates. Perceptions of staffing levels and managerial commitment were the most influential predictors of all the safety outcome measures.

Length of Publication:  7 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient safety culture: an Italian experience.

May 28, 2011

Source:  Journal of Clinical Nursing Vol 20 Issue 7-8 pp1188-1195

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: April 2011

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The authors’ aim was to understand the level of awareness health professionals working in an Italian hospital had of patient safety by using the Italian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire and also to validate the tool’s effectiveness.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important information:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgement: NHS Evidence