Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach

January 27, 2016

Source:  BMJ Open

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Date of publication:  December 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Researchers in Australia tested using senior pharmacy trainees as peer educators to improve knowledge about patient safety. Junior trainees were surveyed before, immediately after and one month after taking part in a patient safety education programme. Feedback was compared with those who had not taken part. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. Two lectures were provided by a lecturer and a workshop was provided by final-year pharmacy students. Trainees’ safety attitudes improved, particularly with regards to questioning behaviours and open disclosure of incidents.

Length of publication:  1 webpage


Improving patient safety through feedback on prescribing errors

July 30, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  June 2014

Publication type:  Webinar

In a nutshell: Discusses a case study video from Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Bryony Dean Franklin from the Trust talks about the Shine 2012 project, which aimed to improve patient safety through feedback on prescribing errors. In UK studies of the causes of prescribing errors, a common theme is that junior doctors are often unaware of making errors and receive little feedback on errors and how to prevent them. According to research, providing feedback on aspects of clinical performance can improve quality of care and lead to professional behaviour change. There is little experience with this approach in the UK hospital setting though so this project proposed a practical low-cost intervention building on hospital pharmacists’ existing practice to identify and rectify prescribing errors.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Dispensing good advice to bridge the gap in patient safety

May 28, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: The Health Foundation has awarded The Scottish Patient Safety Programme (SPSP) in Primary Care, which is run by Healthcare Improvement Scotland, funding of £450,000 over two years to run an improvement collaborative to enhance communications between GPs and pharmacists working in primary care.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Causes of Medication Administration Errors in Hospitals: a Systematic Review of Quantitative and Qualitative Evidence

December 18, 2013

Source:  Drug Safety vol/iss 36/11 pp. 1045-1067

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Date of publication:  November 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The causes of medication administration errors in hospital were examined in this article. Medication lapses were the most commonly reported medication administration errors, followed by mistakes-based on inaccurate knowledge or deliberate violations. Factors potentially leading to medication administration errors included inadequate written communication, problems with medicines supply and storage such as pharmacy dispensing errors and ward stock management, perceived high workload, problems with access to or functioning of ward equipment, patient availability or acuity, fatigue or stress amongst professionals and distractions during drug administration. Medication administration errors are influenced by multiple systems factors so managers and clinicians need to take a system-wide approach to minimise errors.

Length of Publication:  23 pages


RPS publishes professional standards for homecare services

October 30, 2013

Source:  Royal Pharmaceutical Society

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Date of publication:  September 2013

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  New professional standards for homecare services have been published by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) to provide a best practice framework for the application and delivery of homecare services. As homecare services are being commissioned more and more, the RPS and the Department of Health Homecare Strategy Board, has produced ten standards to ensure patient safety and the effective management of medicines delivered by homecare methods.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Patient safety in healthcare preregistration educational curricula: multiple case study-based investigations of eight medicine, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy university courses

July 31, 2013

Source:  BMJ Qual Saf. 2013 Jun 1. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article aimed to investigate the formal and informal ways preregistration students from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and the allied healthcare professions learn about patient safety. Students were mainly taught about safety-related issues in isolation and there were limited opportunities for interprofessional learning and bridging the gaps between educational, practice and policy contexts. The authors state that a lot of thought needs to be given to the appointment of curriculum leads for patient safety and that they should be encouraged to work strategically across disciplines and topic areas. Role models should help students to make connections between theoretical considerations and routine clinical care.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Understanding the attitudes of hospital pharmacists to reporting medication incidents: a qualitative study.

February 25, 2013

Source:  Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy Vol/iss 9/1 pp.80-89

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Date of publication:  January 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In England, hospital pharmacists said that medication errors are common and that they are often not reported. Error reporting forms are thought to be cumbersome and time consuming. It could be useful to simplify reporting forms, ensure staff are praised for reporting and make sure that any issues are addressed quickly so that staff feel that reporting is worthwhile.

Length of Publication:  10 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.