Accounting for actions and omissions: a discourse analysis of student nurse accounts of responding to instances of poor care

February 24, 2016

Source:  Journal of Advanced Nursing [epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Failure to report cases of poor care may have serious consequences for patient safety. The aim of this study was to explore how nursing students account for decisions to report or not report poor care witnessed on placement and to examine the implications of findings for educators.

The findings were that participants took care to present themselves in a positive light regardless of whether or not they had reported an episode of concern. Those who had reported tended to attribute their actions to internal factors such as moral strength and a commitment to a professional code. Those who had not or would not report concerns provided accounts which referred to external influences that prevented them from doing so or made reporting pointless.

This study provides information about how students account for their actions and omissions in relation to the reporting of poor care. Findings suggest ways educators might increase reporting of concerns.

Length of publication:  Unspecified


Learning to ensure patient safety in clinical settings: comparing Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions

August 26, 2015

Source:  Journal of Clinical Nursing [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  July 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to explore and compare Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions of their learning about patient safety in clinical settings. The participants were final year preregistration nursing students from two universities in Finland and two in England. The Finnish nursing students had significantly more critical perceptions on their learning about patient safety in clinical settings than the British students. Fewer Finnish students had practiced reporting of incidents in clinical settings compared to British students. Nursing students appear to want more learning opportunities related to patient safety compared to the reality in clinical settings.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


An immersive “simulation week” enhances clinical performance of incoming surgical interns improved performance persists at 6 months follow-up

May 22, 2015

Source:  Surgery 157/3 pp. 432-43

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Date of publication:  March 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to develop, pilot, and evaluate clinical performance after an immersive simulation course for incoming interns. Graduating students were recruited for a 1-week immersive simulation course. Controls received no simulation training. Primary outcome was clinical performance on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) of clinical procedures and surgical technical skills. The immersive simulation course objectively improved subjects’ clinical skills, technical skills, and confidence. Despite similar clinical experience as controls, the intervention group’s improved performance persisted at 6 months follow-up. This intervention could reduce errors and enhance patient safety.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Patient safety in healthcare preregistration educational curricula: multiple case study-based investigations of eight medicine, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy university courses

July 31, 2013

Source:  BMJ Qual Saf. 2013 Jun 1. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article aimed to investigate the formal and informal ways preregistration students from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and the allied healthcare professions learn about patient safety. Students were mainly taught about safety-related issues in isolation and there were limited opportunities for interprofessional learning and bridging the gaps between educational, practice and policy contexts. The authors state that a lot of thought needs to be given to the appointment of curriculum leads for patient safety and that they should be encouraged to work strategically across disciplines and topic areas. Role models should help students to make connections between theoretical considerations and routine clinical care.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Developing nursing students’ decision making skills: are early warning scoring systems helpful?

March 27, 2013

Source:  Nurse Educ Pract. Vol/iss 13/1 pp. 1-3.

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Date of publication:  January 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This paper states that early identification of patient deterioration is of vital importance for patient safety and it contributes to the emerging debate on Early Warning Scoring Systems. It explores the competence of student nurses in this area and focuses on three models of clinical decision making.

Length of Publication:  3 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Can teaching medical students to investigate medication errors change their attitudes towards patient safety?

May 28, 2011

Source: BMJ Quality & Safety  2011;20:319-325

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Date of publication: February 2011

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: This article considers if giving medical students a basic knowledge of common medication errors before they start to see patients in hospital can reduce the chance of them making mistakes. The study was  carried out during a paediatric rotation at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

Length of publication: 8 pages

Some important notes: This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library

Acknowledgement: The British Journal of Healthcare Computing & Information Management