Improved safety culture and teamwork climate are associated with decreases in patient harm and hospital mortality across a hospital system

February 24, 2016

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Improved safety and teamwork culture has been associated with decreased patient harm within specific units in hospitals or hospital groups. Most studies have focused on a specific harm type. This study’s objective was to document such an association across an entire hospital system and across multiple harm types.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

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Situation, background, assessment, and recommendation-guided huddles improve communication and teamwork in the emergency department

December 23, 2015

Source:  Journal of Emergency Nursing 41/6 pp. 484–488

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Date of publication:  October 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  A performance-improvement project with the structured processes of a joint patient evaluation and huddle was implemented within a US pediatric emergency department. The following outcomes were measured: presence or absence of joint patient evaluation and SBAR-guided huddle, verbalization of treatment plan, communication, teamwork, and nurse satisfaction. This project showed the feasibility of a simple and inexpensive joint nurse practitioner–registered nurse patient evaluation followed by a structured huddle, which improved communication, teamwork, and nurse satisfaction scores. This performance-improvement project has the potential to enhance efficiency by reducing redundancy, as well as to improve patient safety through the use of structured communication techniques.

Length of publiction:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Quality management and perceptions of teamwork and safety climate in European hospitals

November 25, 2015

Source: International Journal for Quality in Healthcare [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to investigate the associations of quality management systems with teamwork and safety climate, and to describe and compare differences in perceptions of teamwork climate and safety climate among clinical leaders and frontline clinicians.

Length of Publication:   Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Multiprofessional Team Simulation Training, Based on an Obstetric Model, Can Improve Teamwork in Other Areas of Health Care

June 24, 2013

Source:  American Journal of Medical Quality 2013 May 7. [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:   May 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Multi-professional scenario-based training was run in England to improve the safety culture and teamwork climate of three surgical wards at one hospital. Over a four-month period, 22 team training sessions were run, each comprising teams of four or five medical and nursing staff. Safety culture was measured before and after training using a validated tool. Scenario-based training was associated with an improvement in safety culture on the wards and a trend towards improved teamwork climate. However staff were less likely to think that staffing levels were adequate or have favourable perceptions of hospital management. This may be because the scenarios highlighted flaws in current practice.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Exploring error in team-based acute care scenarios: an observational study from the United Kingdom

August 31, 2012

Source:  Academic Medicine

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Date of publication:  June 2012

Publication type:  Article

In a nutshell:  This article follows 38 junior doctors, in their first year after medical qualification, in NHS Lothian.  It looks at the errors made by these doctors and investigates whether there was a single cause. The article reasons that identifying a single cause for each error could identify which knowledge and skills which are most vulnerable to specific errors and enable specially tailored educational strategies to be developed to try to prevent them.

Acknowledgements:  Kings Fund

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Clinical human factors: the need to speak up to improve patient safety.

July 30, 2012

Source:  Nursing Standard

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Date of publication: May 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article uses a case study and learning derived from a subsequent independent inquiry to motivate nurses to identify how human factors affect individual and team performance. It is shown how patient safety benefits greatly when nurses speak up when concerned and the role of situational awareness is stressed.

Length of publication:  6 pages


How implementing the surgical safety checklist improved staff teamwork in theatre

June 9, 2010

Source:  Nursing Times, 26 March 2010

Click here to access fulltext

Date of publication:  March 2010

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article is about the experience of Guys’ and St Thomas’ Foundation Trust in implementing a surgical safety checklist published by WHO.

Length of publication: Webpage

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements:  WHO.  Link here to access the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist