Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 5

May 22, 2015
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An immersive “simulation week” enhances clinical performance of incoming surgical interns improved performance persists at 6 months follow-up

May 22, 2015

Source:  Surgery 157/3 pp. 432-43

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Date of publication:  March 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to develop, pilot, and evaluate clinical performance after an immersive simulation course for incoming interns. Graduating students were recruited for a 1-week immersive simulation course. Controls received no simulation training. Primary outcome was clinical performance on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) of clinical procedures and surgical technical skills. The immersive simulation course objectively improved subjects’ clinical skills, technical skills, and confidence. Despite similar clinical experience as controls, the intervention group’s improved performance persisted at 6 months follow-up. This intervention could reduce errors and enhance patient safety.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


2010 to 2015 government policy: patient safety

May 22, 2015

Source:  Department of Health

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Date of publicationMay 2015

Publication type:  Policy paper

In a nutshell: This policy paper, published on 7 May 2015, shows the policy of the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Developing person-centred analysis of harm in a paediatric hospital: a quality improvement report

May 22, 2015

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety 24/5 pp. 337-44

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Date of publicationMay 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: Staff at Great Ormond Street Hospital developed and tested a tool specifically designed for patients and families to report harm. Processes to report harm were developed over a 10-month period. The tool was tested in different formats and it moved from a provider centric to a person-centred tool analysed in real time. Feedback to staff provided learning opportunities. Improvements in culture climate and staff reporting were noted in the short term. The integration of patient involvement in safety monitoring systems is vital to achieve safety. The testing and introduction of a self-reporting, real-time bedside tool has led to active engagement with families and patients and raised awareness.

Length of Publication:  8 pages


Can staff and patient perspectives on hospital safety predict harm-free care? An analysis of staff and patient survey data and routinely collected outcomes

May 22, 2015

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publicationApril 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the safety information provided by patients is different from that provided by staff and whether it is related to safety outcomes. Data were collected from 33 hospital wards across 3 acute hospital Trusts in the UK. Staff were asked to complete the four outcome measures of the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture, while patients were asked to complete the Patient Measure of Safety and the friends and family test. The friends and family test was associated with patients’ perceptions of safety, but was not associated with safety outcomes. Staff responses to the patient safety culture survey were not significantly correlated with patient responses to the patient measure of safety, but both independently predicted safety outcomes. The findings suggest that although the views of patients and staff predict some overlapping variance in patient safety outcomes, both also offer a unique perspective on patient safety, contributing independently to the prediction of safety outcomes.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Our approach to changing the culture of caring for the acutely unwell patient at a large UK teaching hospital: A service improvement focus on Early Warning Scoring tools

May 22, 2015

Source: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing 31/2 pp. 106-15

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Date of publication:  April 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Early Warning Scoring tools have been in place in Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust for over five years but compliance has been low. A service improvement project commenced across all admission wards in 2013. Prior to the project, only one out of five clinical care targets set were achieved. An established framework for service improvement was used to guide delivery. Since introduction of the service improvement team, consistent signs of improvement have been visible across the admission areas in four out of five of the clinical care targets. The first 12 months of the project has seen benefits in patient care and staff experience.

Length of Publication:  10 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Junior doctors’ views on reporting concerns about patient safety: a qualitative study

May 22, 2015

Source:  Postgraduate Medical Journal [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  April 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study set out to explore the attitudes and barriers to junior doctors formally reporting concerns about patient safety to the organisations in which they are training. A qualitative study was conducted, comprising three focus groups with 10 junior doctors at an Acute Teaching Hospital Trust in the Midlands in 2013. Participants identified that existing incident reporting systems could frustrate efforts to report concerns. They described barriers to reporting, a culture within medicine that was not conducive to reporting concerns, and a lack of feedback providing evidence that formal reporting was worthwhile. They reported a tendency to rely on informal ways of dealing with concerns as an alternative to engaging with formal reporting systems. Attention needs to be paid to the features of reporting systems, the implications of hierarchies and the wider cultural context in which junior doctors work.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library