Can staff and patient perspectives on hospital safety predict harm-free care? An analysis of staff and patient survey data and routinely collected outcomes

May 22, 2015

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publicationApril 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the safety information provided by patients is different from that provided by staff and whether it is related to safety outcomes. Data were collected from 33 hospital wards across 3 acute hospital Trusts in the UK. Staff were asked to complete the four outcome measures of the Hospital Survey of Patient Safety Culture, while patients were asked to complete the Patient Measure of Safety and the friends and family test. The friends and family test was associated with patients’ perceptions of safety, but was not associated with safety outcomes. Staff responses to the patient safety culture survey were not significantly correlated with patient responses to the patient measure of safety, but both independently predicted safety outcomes. The findings suggest that although the views of patients and staff predict some overlapping variance in patient safety outcomes, both also offer a unique perspective on patient safety, contributing independently to the prediction of safety outcomes.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

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Patients as teachers: a randomised controlled trial on the use of personal stories of harm to raise awareness of patient safety for doctors in training

October 1, 2014

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety Aug 18. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to measure the impact of patient narratives used to train junior doctors in patient safety. A trial was conducted in the North Yorkshire East Coast Foundation School (NYECFS). The intervention consisted of 1-h-long patient narratives followed by discussion. The Attitude to Patient Safety Questionnaire (APSQ) and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) were used to measure the impact of the intervention. The authors state that involving patients with experiences of safety incidents in training has an ideological appeal and seems an obvious choice in designing safety interventions, but that they were unable to demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention in changing general attitudes to safety compared to control.

Length of Publication:   Unknown

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Pursuing Zero – a winning approach to safety

June 25, 2014

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  May 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: In May, a team from Great Ormond Street Hospital Foundation Trust was named Berwick Patient Safety Team of the Year at the BMJ Awards. The team have helped the Trust to develop a culture where every member of staff focuses on the importance of providing safe, high quality care for children. The ‘Zero harm, no waits, no waste’ programme was established by Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) seven years ago, with the aim of eliminating all harm to children in their care. The programme aims to embed a culture of improvement and safety throughout the organisation and key to this has been developing strong leadership for change. Throughout the programme the team has also made a point of involving patients and carers.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


The contribution of nurses to incident disclosure: a narrative review

March 26, 2014

Source:  International Journal of Nursing Studies 51/2 pp.334-345

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Reviewers from England explored how nurses feel about disclosing patient safety incidents to patients and if there are any barriers to disclosure. The findings suggested that nurses have a key role in supporting doctors when disclosing incidents to patients, but that they may not be well prepared to disclose incidents to patients independently. Barriers to nurse involvement in incident disclosure included few opportunities for training and many conflicting roles within nursing. Nurses may have a greater role to play in safety incident error disclosure to patients, but they need better training and support to enable them to do this.

Length of Publication:  12 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A guide for HCAs on safe patient transfers

September 25, 2013

Source:  Nursing Times vol/iss 109/26, pp. 20-2

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Date of publication:  July 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article offers a definition of patient transfer and looks at patient safety and the role of healthcare assistants throughout the three phases of transfer. It discusses the role of escorting patients and the difference between transferring and escorting. It concludes that, for patients to be transferred safely adequate preparation is needed and the process should occur in distinct phases, each of which must be carried out with proper care and attention.

Length of Publication:  3 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Berwick review into patient safety

August 29, 2013

Source:  Department of Health

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Date of publication:  August 2013

Publication type:  Report

In a nutshell:  The main problems affecting patient safety in the NHS are highlighted in this report, by Professor Don Berwick, an international expert in patient safety, and there are recommendations made to address them. The report states that the health system must recognise the need for system wide change and insist on the primacy of working with patients and carers to achieve health care goals. It also says that the NHS needs to ensure that the responsibility for functions related to safety and improvement are established clearly and simply.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Nurse-led ward rounds: a valuable contribution to acute stroke care

October 29, 2012

Source: British Journal of Nursing  Vol/iss  21/13  pp801-5

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Date of publication: July 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: This article looks at an example of how the Imperial College Healthcare Trust improved stroke care by setting up a team to carry out nurse-led ward round.  This team focussed specifically on nursing goals, issues and looking at stroke outcome measures.  This has lead to improved communication between the nursing staff and patients, empowering nurses and improving patient care and safety.

Length of publication: 4 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.