Quality improvement in surgery combining lean improvement methods with teamwork training: a controlled before-after study

October 28, 2015

Source:  PLOS ONE 10/9 e0138490

Follow this link for item

Date of publication: September 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study investigated the effectiveness of combining teamwork training and lean process improvement, two distinct approaches to improving surgical safety. A controlled interrupted time series study was conducted in a specialist UK Orthopaedic hospital incorporating a plastic surgery team (which received the intervention) and an Orthopaedic theatre team acting as a control. The study found that combining teamwork training and systems improvement enhanced both technical and non-technical operating team process measures, and were associated with a trend to better safety outcome measures in a controlled study comparison. The authors suggest that approaches which address both system and culture dimensions of safety may prove valuable in reducing risks to patients.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Do safety checklists improve teamwork and communication in the operating room? A systematic review

January 29, 2014

Source:  Annals of Surgery vol/iss 258/6 pp. 856–871

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  December 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This systematic review aimed to assess the impact of surgical safety checklists on the quality of teamwork and communication in the operating room (OR). The methods for assessing teamwork and communication included surveys, observations, interviews, and 360° assessments. The evidence suggests that safety checklists can improve the quality of OR teamwork and communication, however, when used incorrectly or when individuals do not believe in the process, checklists may have a negative impact on the function of the team. Overall, safety checklists are beneficial for OR teamwork and communication and this may be one device through which patient outcomes are improved.

Length of Publication:  16 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The surgical safety checklist survey: a national perspective on patient safety

June 24, 2013

Source:  Irish Journal of Medical Science Vol/iss 182/2 pp. 171-176

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The World Health Organisation recommended practices to ensure the safety of patients worldwide in 2008. This led to the development of the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) which Ireland has endorsed. The authors aimed to determine whether the SSC is being implemented and to identify problems associated with its introduction and on-going implementation. They found that it has not been implemented throughout all operating departments in Ireland, but where it has been introduced there has been a perceived positive change in safety culture. The authors state that a formal audit of morbidity and mortality is required.

Length of Publication:  6 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Retained surgical sponges, needles and instruments

May 29, 2013

Source:  Ann R Coll Surg Engl. Vol/iss 95/2 pp. 87-92

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  March 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Retained sponges and instruments (RSI) due to surgery are a recognised medical ‘never event’. The aim of this review was to reveal the extent of the problem of RSI and to detect preventative strategies. Vigilance among operating theatre personnel is paramount if RSI is to be prevented.

Length of Publication:  6 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Developing a culture of safety in the surgical suite

August 28, 2010

Source: Healthcare Purchasing News 34(7) pp. 18-22

Click here to access fulltext

Date of publication: July 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The article focuses on how to make patient safety a priority in operating rooms and discusses how adverse events occur and how cross-disciplinary participation can motivate the adoption of new safety practices.

Length of publication: 4 Pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article.  Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements: HEALTH BUSINESS ELITE