Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 2

February 20, 2015
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Safer Clinical Systems: evaluation findings

February 20, 2015

Source:  The Health Foundation

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Date of publication:  December 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: The Health Foundation’s Safer Clinical Systems programme explores how approaches from other industries could be used to improve safety in the NHS. The evaluation team make a number of recommendations in this report and say that further analysis is needed to assess whether this approach is better or more cost-effective than other approaches to improving safety.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Health Education England projects improve safety and patient care

February 20, 2015

Source:  Health Education England

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: Healthcare staff and patients are benefiting from a new two-year programme of work at Health Education England (HEE) that is delivering direct improvements to patient care and safety. Projects in the HEE Better Training Better Care (BTBC) Programme have enhanced the quality of postgraduate medical education. The award winning pilot run at Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust focused on improving clinical handovers, and training staff in the handover process. Another of the projects focused on reducing serious incidents through simulation training in East London NHS Foundation Trust.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Cutting medical training by years could harm patient safety, doctors warn

February 20, 2015

Source:  The Telegraph 30 January 2015

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: According to leading doctors’ groups, proposals to shorten medical training could seriously compromise patients’ safety. Plans outlined in an independent review included shortening consultant training from between eight to 10 years to between six to eight years. Junior doctors would become fully registered immediately after completing medical school, but would then spend four to six years in broad-based speciality training. The BMA has called on the government to “pause” such policy development whilst safety concerns are addressed and the changes are piloted in small studies.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Factors contributing to registered nurse medication administration error: a narrative review

February 20, 2015

Source:  International Journal of Nursing Studies 52/1 pp. 403-20

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: The authors explored the factors contributing to medication administration incidents amongst registered nurses. A number of factors, including the environment and characteristics of the nurse, were found to influence medication administration incidents. In terms of environment, clinical workload and work setting were important. In terms of nurse characteristics, nurses’ lived experience of work and their demographics were significant. More studies have focused on environmental issues than on how personal characteristics may contribute to incidents. Any inter-relationship between factors was not explored.

Length of Publication:  17 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


CQC could become enforcer of ‘zero harm’ rules

February 20, 2015

Source:  Health Service Journal 21 January 2015

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  A proposed new law on patient safety would open the door to tougher regulation of health and care providers by the Care Quality Commission.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


New standards put patient safety at the heart of medical education and training

February 20, 2015

Source: General Medical Council

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Date of publication: January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  The General Medical Council (GMC) has launched a consultation on new standards which will create a single set of standards for organisations delivering medical education and training across the UK. The standards are designed to make sure that fairness and patients’ safety, experience and quality of care lie at the core of teaching and training. The standards would include a requirement for organisations to promote and encourage a culture that reflects on and learns from mistakes, incidents and near misses. The consultation closes on 24 March 2015.

Length of Publication:  1 web page