Continuous improvement of patient safety: the case for change in the NHS

November 25, 2015

Source:  The Health Foundation

Follow this link for item

Date of publication: November 2015

Publication type:  Report

In a nutshell: This report synthesises the lessons from the Health Foundation’s work on improving patient safety. Part I illustrates why improving safety is so difficult and complex, and why current approaches need to change. Part II looks at some of the work being done to improve safety and offers examples and insights to support practical improvements in patient safety. In Part III, the report explains why the system needs to think differently about safety, giving policymakers an insight into how their actions can create an environment where continuous safety improvement will flourish, as well as how they can help to tackle system-wide problems that hinder local improvement.

Length of Publication:  40 pages

Advertisements

Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 10

October 28, 2015

Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 10

October 28, 2015

Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections overview

October 28, 2015

Source:  NICE

Follow this link for item

Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  NICE Pathway

In a nutshell:  The NICE Pathway on the Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections overview was updated on 17 August 2015 to include the NICE pathway on antimicrobial stewardship.

Length of Publication:  7 pages


Staff’s bright idea implemented to enhance patient safety

October 28, 2015

Source:  Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

Follow this link for item

Date of publicationSeptember 2015

Publication type:  Trust website

In a nutshell: Three members of Derriford Hospital’s Physiotherapy team have come up with an idea for high visibility tabards to improve patient safety and help reassure patients when they undergo stair assessments. The patients are often very nervous and can be quite unsteady and people pushing past is putting those patients under even more stress which ultimately affects their performance and even their discharge. In an effort to stop this happening, Physiotherapy team members came up with the idea for the high visibility tabards. The tabards display the message ‘Stop. Stair assessment in progress. Please Wait’, in an attempt to highlight to other stair users the need for patience and consideration.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Safety of antidiabetes medications: an update

October 28, 2015

Source:  Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 98/2 pp. 185–195

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In this paper, recent clinical studies addressing safety profiles of antidiabetes medications are reviewed. New prospective and population-based studies continue to indicate that the benefits of improved glucose control outweigh the risks associated with antidiabetes medications in most patients with type 2 diabetes.

Length of Publication:  11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


A realist analysis of hospital patient safety in Wales: applied learning for alternative contexts from a multisite case study

October 28, 2015

Source:  Health Services and Delivery Research 3/40

Follow this link for item

Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study was designed to address gaps in conceptual, methodological and empirical knowledge about the influence of context on the local implementation of patient safety programmes.  The findings show how local implementation of patient safety interventions are impacted and modified by particular aspects of context.  Heightened awareness of the influence of context on the local implementation of patient safety programmes is required to inform the design of such interventions and to ensure their effective implementation and operationalisation in the day-to-day practice of health-care teams.

Length of Publication:  242 pages