Simulation-based training: the missing link to lastingly improved safety and health?

March 23, 2016

Source: Postgraduate Medical Journal [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Medical education has traditionally relied on on-the-job training. However, the often used ‘see one, do one, teach one’ approach may be detrimental to patient safety and health, as it exposes patients to inexperienced healthcare practitioners. In an effort to reduce human errors and improve operational safety, simulation-based training (SBT) has been recognised as an effective methodology.

Contents of SBT include conceptual understanding, technical skills, decision-making skills, and attitudes and behaviours summarised as teamwork. Thus, theoretical advantages of SBT over traditional educational methodologies are manifold. This article reviews available evidence about the effectiveness of SBT of technical and non-technical skills with regard to improvements in medical care, patient safety and health.

Length of publication:  3 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

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Application of a human factors classification framework for patient safety to identify precursor and contributing factors to adverse clinical incidents in hospital

February 24, 2016

Source:  Applied Ergonomics Jan/52 pp. 185-95

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to identify temporal precursor and associated contributing factors for adverse clinical incidents in a hospital setting using the Human Factors Classification Framework (HFCF) for patient safety. A random sample of 498 clinical incidents were reviewed. The framework identified key precursor events (PE), contributing factors (CF) and the prime causes of incidents. Descriptive statistics and correspondence analysis were used to examine incident characteristics. Staff action was the most common type of PE identified. Correspondence analysis for all PEs that involved staff action by error type showed that rule-based errors were strongly related to performing medical or monitoring tasks or the administration of medication. Skill-based errors were strongly related to misdiagnoses. Factors relating to the organisation (66.9%) or the patient (53.2%) were the most commonly identified CFs. The HFCF for patient safety was able to identify patterns of causation for the clinical incidents, highlighting the need for targeted preventive approaches, based on an understanding of how and why incidents occur.

Length of publication:  11 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Human factors in healthcare: welcome progress, but still scratching the surface

January 27, 2016

Source: BMJ Quality and Safety 2015/0 pp. 1-5

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Date of publication:  November 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article investigates the adoption of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) principles within healthcare settings in the UK and the US.  By considering the history, evolution and spread of HFE, the authors hope to enhance translation into healthcare lessons from industry, such as aviation, oil and gas and rail transport, to promote the integration of HFE into healthcare and improve quality of care and patient safety.

Length of publication:  5 pages