Researchers’ roles in patient safety improvement

March 23, 2016

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety 12/1 pp. 25–33

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article explores how researchers can contribute to patient safety improvement with the aim of expanding the instrumental role researchers have often occupied in relation to patient safety improvement.

The conclusions were that when working side by side with “practice,” researchers are offered and engage in several different activities. The way researchers contribute to patient safety improvement and balance between different roles depends on the purpose of the study, as well as on the underlying patient safety improvement models. Different patient safety research paradigms seem to emphasize different improvement roles, and thus, they also face different challenges. Open reflection on the underlying improvement models and roles can help researchers with different backgrounds—as well as other actors involved in patient safety improvement—in structuring their work and collaborating productively.

Length of publication:  9 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


The daily relationships between staffing, safety perceptions and personality in hospital nursing: a longitudinal on-line diary study

March 23, 2016

Source: International Journal of Nursing Studies 59 pp. 27–37

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The association between poor staffing conditions and negative patient safety consequences is well established within hospital nursing. However, many studies have been limited to nurse population level associations, and have used routine data to examine relationships. As a result, it is less clear how these relationships might be manifested at the individual nurse level on a day-to-day basis. Furthermore, personality may have direct and moderating roles in terms of work environment and patient safety associations, but limited research has explored personality in this context.

The findings elucidate the potential mechanisms by which patient safety risks arise within hospital nursing, and suggest that nurses may not respond to staffing conditions in the same way, dependent upon personality. Further understanding of these relationships will enable staff to be supported in terms of work environment conditions on an individual basis.

Length of publication:  11 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

 


Patient safety and the problem of many hands

March 23, 2016

Source: BMJ Quality & Safety [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Healthcare worldwide is faced with a crisis of patient safety. Notwithstanding occasional successes in relation to specific harms, safety as a system characteristic has remained elusive. The authors of this article propose that one neglected reason why the safety problem has proved so stubborn is that healthcare suffers from a pathology known in the public administration literature as the problem of many hands. It is a problem that arises in contexts where multiple actors—organisations, individuals, groups—each contribute to effects seen at system level, but it remains difficult to hold any single actor responsible for these effects. This paper calls for recognition of the problem of many hands and for attention to be given to how it might most optimally be addressed in a healthcare context.

Length of publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Improving the safety of vaccine delivery

March 23, 2016

Source:  Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Vaccines save millions of lives per annum and are an integral part of community primary care provision worldwide. The World Health Organization has highlighted that the adverse events due to the vaccine delivery process outnumber those arising from the pharmacological properties of the vaccines themselves. Whilst it is known that as many as one in three patients receiving a vaccine will encounter some form of error, little is known about their underlying causes and how to mitigate them in practice. Patient safety incident reporting systems and drug adverse event surveillance systems are proving useful informants for understanding the underlying causes of those errors. The challenge now lies in the identification and implementation of changes to improve vaccine safety at multiple levels: from patient level interventions through to organisational efforts at local, national and international levels. The authors consider the potential benefits for maximising learning from patient safety incident reports to improve the quality and safety of care delivery.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


The UK: your partner for global healthcare solutions – Improving the quality and safety of patient care

March 23, 2016

Source:  Department of Health

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Date of publication:  March 2016

Publication type:  Brochure

In a nutshell:  In 2014 the Commonwealth Fund named the NHS as the number one health service for safe care amongst the 11 developed nations studied. The NHS is aiming for a future where avoidable harm is prevented, where 100% of patients achieve the shortest, most uneventful hospital admissions, and where everyone achieves the best possible outcome.

This publication outlines some of the initiatives the UK is currently pursuing, and the organisations which are leading the way in standards of safety. The different sections also provide information on the partners who can best help you achieve your goal of safer, better healthcare.

Length of publication:  15 pages


Acceptability of health care–related risks: a literature review

March 23, 2016

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety 12/1 pp. 1-10

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In contrast to risk acceptability, the concept of risk perception is of limited interest to risk managers because it does not inform on the behaviours and actions resulting from these perceptions. The aim of this work was to define the concept of social acceptability of risk through an in-depth examination of literature from economic, sociocognitive, psychometric, sociological/anthropological, and interactionist research fields, the study found that when assessing risks, individuals use a variety of psychological and social processes that include their perception not only of a given risk but also of their own personal and social resources. This global perception has a direct impact on the responses and actual behaviour of individuals and groups, enabling them to cope with the risk and/or manage it.

The authors concluded that social acceptability includes perceptions related to risks and the stated intentions of individual behaviour. This concept may therefore be relevant for defining local and national patient safety priorities.

Length of publication:  10 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment

March 23, 2016

Source: British Journal of Nursing 25/3

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians’ attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library