Patient safety in orthopaedics: State of the art.

January 30, 2013

Source:   Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Series B Vol/iss  94B/12  pp1595-1597.

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Date of publication:  December 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: The authors summarise and focus on the safety concerns within the field of trauma and orthopaedic surgery with specific emphasis placed on current controversies and reforms within the National Health Service.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Triage and patient safety in emergency departments

November 3, 2011

Source:  BMJ News and Articles

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication type:  Editorial

In a nutshell:  This editorial discusses overcrowding and the requirement for re-engineering triage models and the patient flow process. There are increased expectations of a 24/7 medical service. Patient safety is put at risk by some new changes.

Length of publication:  1 web page

Some important notes:  This article is available in full text to all NHS Staff using Athens, for more information about accessing full text follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Triage Position Statement

May 28, 2011

Source: College of Emergency Medicine

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Date of publication: April 2011

Publication type: Report

In a nutshell: This document sets out ways to streamline the triage process to reduce waiting times, ensure that the patient sees the right healthcare professional quicker.

Length of publication: 3 pages

Acknowledgement: NHS Evidence


Best practice in the management of epidural analgesia in the hospital setting

January 28, 2011

Source: NHS Evidence Health Management

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Date of publication: November 2010

Publication type: Guidelines

In a nutshell: These guidelines look at best practice in the use of epidural analgesia within hospitals.  The main subjects focused on are continuous influsions, intermittent top-up injections and patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA).  They also look at the features of epidural pain management services.

Length of publication: 15 pages