Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 8

August 26, 2015
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Operating theatre teams should review the use of background music, study suggests

August 26, 2015

Source:  University College London, Institute of Education

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Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: An analysis of video footage taken during 20 operations shows that some operating theatre teams are negatively affected by background music during surgery. The study suggests that communication within the theatre team can be impaired when music is playing. The authors recommend that surgical teams hold discussions about playing music during an operation, with particular emphasis on taking into consideration the views of nurses. A good opportunity for this would be during the ‘Time Out’ section of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Surgery Safety Checklist. Based on their broader body of research, the team has developed a training model – Video Supported Simulation for Interactions in the Operating Theatre (ViSIOT) – that aims to improve communication and includes strategies to alleviate problems associated with music.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Workplace training for senior trainees: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of current approaches to promote patient safety

August 26, 2015

Source:  Postgraduate Medical Journal [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors of this review say that developing patient safety skills and knowledge among advanced trainee doctors is essential. They aimed to establish the use of clinical supervision and other workplace training to develop non-technical patient safety competency in advanced trainee doctors. The findings showed that clinical supervision is not identified as an avenue for embedding patient safety skills in the workplace and is therefore not evaluated as a method to teach trainees these skills. Workplace training in non-technical patient safety skills is limited, but one-off training courses are sometimes used. It is of utmost importance to support supervisors to identify teaching moments during supervision and to give weight to non-technical skills and technical skills equally.

Length of Publication:  11 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Taking a global comparative view of patient safety and care quality

August 26, 2015

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 24/14 pp. 754-5

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Date of publicationJuly 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: In this two-part series, John Tingle discusses some key patient-safety and health-quality publications from organisations across the world.

Length of Publication:  2 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Learning to ensure patient safety in clinical settings: comparing Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions

August 26, 2015

Source:  Journal of Clinical Nursing [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  July 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to explore and compare Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions of their learning about patient safety in clinical settings. The participants were final year preregistration nursing students from two universities in Finland and two in England. The Finnish nursing students had significantly more critical perceptions on their learning about patient safety in clinical settings than the British students. Fewer Finnish students had practiced reporting of incidents in clinical settings compared to British students. Nursing students appear to want more learning opportunities related to patient safety compared to the reality in clinical settings.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


How effective are patient safety initiatives? A retrospective patient record review study of changes to patient safety over time

August 26, 2015

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  July 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to assess whether, compared with previous years, hospital care became safer in 2011/2012, expressing itself in a fall in preventable adverse event (AE) rates alongside patient safety initiatives. The main patient safety initiatives in hospital care at a national level between 2004 and 2012 were small as well as large-scale multifaceted programmes. The study showed some improvements in preventable AEs in the areas that were addressed during the comprehensive national safety programme. There are signs that such a programme has a positive impact on patient safety.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Effective communication and teamwork promotes patient safety

August 26, 2015

Source:  Nursing Standard 29/49 pp. 50-57

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Date of publication:  August 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article introduces behaviours that support communication, co-operation and co-ordination in teams. It explores the central role of communication in enabling co-operation and co-ordination. A human factors perspective is used to examine tools to improve communication and identify barriers to effective team communication in health care.

Length of Publication:  8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library