Patient Safety Horizon Scanning Volume 5 Issue 2

February 26, 2014

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus screening as a patient safety initiative: using patients’ experiences to improve the quality of screening practices

February 26, 2014

Source:  Journal of Clinical Nursing 23/1-2 pp. 221-231

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  January 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Researchers from Scotland examined what patients thought of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening from admissions to six hospitals. Screening was generally acceptable to patients and it helped to generate confidence that hospitals were tackling healthcare-associated infections. Patients thought that better information could have been provided, however, and they wanted to be told the results of their screening test.

Length of Publication:   11 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The biggest patient safety initiative in the history of the NHS

February 26, 2014

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  January 2014

Publication type:  Blog item

In a nutshell:  In this blog, Dr Mike Durkin, NHS England National Director of Patient Safety, reflects on a ‘design day’ event that has seen work begin in earnest to create a countrywide network to improve patient safety across England. At the event, 120 leaders and experts in patient safety joined forces to combine their knowledge and experience to begin to shape the future of patient safety collaboratives.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


New team to ‘improve patient safety’ at Noble’s hospital

February 26, 2014

Source:  BBC News

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Date of publication:  February 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  The Department of Health has announced that a “patient safety improvement” team has been created at Noble’s hospital in the Isle of Man. According to the government, the critical care outreach team, made up of qualified practitioners, has been established to “enhance care”. The first area to be examined is the care of critically ill patients. The outreach service will operate seven days a week, between 07:15 and 20:45.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Another vital step towards keeping patients free from harm

February 26, 2014

Source:  NHS England

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Date of publication:  January 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  The new National Patient Safety Alerting System (NPSAS) has been launched. NPSAS is an important tool that NHS England will use to ensure warnings of potential risks to the safety of patients can be swiftly developed and disseminated to every part of the NHS. The Director of Patient Safety, Dr Mike Durkin, discusses the difference it will make in this news item.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


A multicentre cohort study assessing day of week effect and outcome from emergency appendicectomy

February 26, 2014

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety [Epub ahead of print]

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publicationFebruary 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Some evidence suggests that patients having treatment at weekends may be subject to different care processes and outcomes compared with weekdays. This study aimed to determine whether clinical outcomes from weekend appendicectomy are different from those performed in the week. A multicentre cohort study was conducted during May-June 2012. The main outcome was the 30-day adverse event rate. The results showed that weekend appendicectomy was not associated with increased 30-day adverse events. Smaller increases that may be shown by larger studies could not be ruled out. Patients operated on at weekends can be subject to different care processes, which may expose them to risk.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Transfusion and hemovigilance in pediatrics

February 26, 2014

Source:  Pediatric Clinics of North America 60/6 pp. 1527-1540

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  December 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Hemovigilance is an essential part of the transfusion process. It covers the whole transfusion chain. The UK surveillance scheme demonstrates how information on adverse incidents can be used to improve patient safety, influencing the management of donors and improved education and training for the many people involved in the transfusion process. The scheme has collected data for 16 years.

Length of Publication:  14 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.