Accounting for actions and omissions: a discourse analysis of student nurse accounts of responding to instances of poor care

February 24, 2016

Source:  Journal of Advanced Nursing [epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Failure to report cases of poor care may have serious consequences for patient safety. The aim of this study was to explore how nursing students account for decisions to report or not report poor care witnessed on placement and to examine the implications of findings for educators.

The findings were that participants took care to present themselves in a positive light regardless of whether or not they had reported an episode of concern. Those who had reported tended to attribute their actions to internal factors such as moral strength and a commitment to a professional code. Those who had not or would not report concerns provided accounts which referred to external influences that prevented them from doing so or made reporting pointless.

This study provides information about how students account for their actions and omissions in relation to the reporting of poor care. Findings suggest ways educators might increase reporting of concerns.

Length of publication:  Unspecified


Human factors in healthcare: welcome progress, but still scratching the surface

January 27, 2016

Source: BMJ Quality and Safety 2015/0 pp. 1-5

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Date of publication:  November 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article investigates the adoption of human factors and ergonomics (HFE) principles within healthcare settings in the UK and the US.  By considering the history, evolution and spread of HFE, the authors hope to enhance translation into healthcare lessons from industry, such as aviation, oil and gas and rail transport, to promote the integration of HFE into healthcare and improve quality of care and patient safety.

Length of publication:  5 pages


Taking a global comparative view of patient safety and care quality

August 26, 2015

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 24/14 pp. 754-5

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Date of publicationJuly 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: In this two-part series, John Tingle discusses some key patient-safety and health-quality publications from organisations across the world.

Length of Publication:  2 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


CQC could become enforcer of ‘zero harm’ rules

February 20, 2015

Source:  Health Service Journal 21 January 2015

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Date of publication:  January 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  A proposed new law on patient safety would open the door to tougher regulation of health and care providers by the Care Quality Commission.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Impact of a structured template and staff training on compliance and quality of clinical handover

December 3, 2012

Source:  International Journal of Surgery, vol/iss 10/9 pp.571-574

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Date of publication:  October 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In this article, researchers assessed whether the quality of clinical handover in hospital could be improved for junior doctors by using a standardised and structured handover template. A computerised template was developed in accordance with handover guidelines by the Royal College of Surgeons of England. The template helped to promote quality of care, improve compliance to agreed standards and protect patient safety.

Length of Publication:  4 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements:  The Heath Foundation