Using a Lean Six Sigma approach to yield sustained pressure ulcer prevention for complex critical care patients

January 27, 2016

Source:  The Journal of Nursing Administration 46/1 pp. 43-48

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  A hospital in the US used Lean Six Sigma methods to reduce the rate of unit-acquired pressure ulcers in intensive care and step-down units. An interdisciplinary team tested four interventions: standardised documentation, equipment monitoring, monitoring patient movements and a checklist for use on unit rounds. The pressure ulcer rate decreased from 4.4% to 2.8%. This improvement was maintained.

Length of publication:   6 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library



Airline style patient safety film set to land in hospitals

November 26, 2014

Source:  Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust

Follow this link for item

Date of publication:  October 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: A new ‘airline style’ film to give patients advice on how to stay safe in hospital has been created with the help of staff at Salford Royal. The film has been developed by Haelo in partnership with Guys’ and St Thomas’ Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. The film aims to reduce avoidable complications such as blood clots, pressure ulcers or falls. Patients will also be provided with an information card with advice on looking after themselves during their hospital stay. The safety advice is being supported by Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, and the national Sign up to Safety campaign. The film can be easily incorporated into Trust websites so patients can watch it before they come into hospital. Hospitals with the Hospedia patient media system are also able to have the film uploaded free of charge to show patients once in hospital.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Developing eLearning for pressure ulcer prevention and management

October 1, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 23 Suppl 15:S16-23

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication:  August 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In April 2012, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHS GGC), in line with the Scottish Best Practice Statement for the Prevention and Management of Pressure Ulcers (Quality Improvement Scotland, 2009 ), and the NHS Health Improvement Scotland (2011) Preventing Pressure Ulcers Change Package, launched an awareness campaign throughout the organisation. It has also more recently adopted a ‘zero-tolerance’ approach to pressure damage. The tissue viability service in NHS GGC recognised that education of front-line staff is essential. An educational framework for pressure ulcer prevention was developed for all levels of healthcare staff involved in the delivery of patient care. An initiative to develop web-based eLearning modules has also been taken forward. The modular online education programme addresses the aims of quality improvement and zero tolerance by supporting the provision of safe and effective person-centred care.

Length of Publication:  8 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


‘How Safe is my Hospital’ site launched

July 30, 2014

Source:  EHealth Insider

Follow this link for item

Date of publication:  June 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:   This news reports on a new section on NHS Choices which will include Trust compliance on ward staffing, incident reporting, pressure ulcers, falls and patient safety. The Department of Health has launched the site, which will enable the public to compare hospitals in England based on a number of safety indicators. The launch is part of the ‘Sign up to Safety’ campaign that aims to save up to 6000 lives over the next three years. The trusts will be ranked according to how openly they are reporting and will be rated as ‘good’, ‘acceptable’ or ‘poor’. As part of the campaign, Jeremy Hunt has also launched a new Safety Action for England team, made of senior clinicians, managers and patients.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Learning from the design and development of the NHS Safety Thermometer

July 30, 2014

Source:  International Journal of Quality in Health Care 26/3 pp. 287-297

Follow this link for item

Date of publication:  June 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The NHS Safety Thermometer has been developed to measure the prevalence of harm from pressure ulcers, falls and urinary tract infections in people with catheters and venous thromboembolism on one day each month. It is for all NHS patients. The tool was developed during a learning collaborative between 161 organisations and tested over a 17 month period, with 73,651 patient entries. The researchers determined that it is possible to obtain national data using a standardised tool completed by site coordinators. It is important that data collectors are well trained.

Length of Publication:  11 pages


Implementing the Safety Thermometer tool in one NHS trust

May 28, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 13-26 23/5 pp. 268-72

Follow this link to abstract

Date of publication:  March 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The NHS in England introduced the NHS Safety Thermometer to address measurement of patient safety using the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme. This article discusses the CQUIN scheme and the thinking behind the focus on pressure ulcers, falls in care, catheter use and urinary tract infection, and venous thromboembolism. The implementation of the scheme in a large NHS foundation trust is described together with its effect within the authors’ organisation on harm-free care for their patients.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.