Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment

March 23, 2016

Source: British Journal of Nursing 25/3

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians’ attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful.

Length of publication:  Unspecified

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library

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Predictors of health care professionals’ attitudes towards involvement in safety-relevant behaviours

September 25, 2013

Source:  Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study examined factors that influence health professionals’ attitudes towards patient participation in patient safety activities. Doctors and nurses from four hospitals in England were surveyed about their attitudes towards patient involvement in two error scenarios regarding hand hygiene and medication safety. Professionals were more in favour of patients intervening about a medication error than about hand hygiene. If a professional hypothetically responded negatively to a patient when they pointed out a potential error, staff thought that this could have a negative effect on the patient-professional relationship. Doctors were less likely than nurses to think it was good for patients to intervene.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: The Health-Care Professional’s Perspective.

January 30, 2013

Source: J Patient Safety  Vol/iss  8/4  pp.182-8

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Date of publication:  December 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Health professionals views were examined by researchers regarding involving patients in safety initiatives. 40 doctors and 40 nurses from one hospital were surveyed. Doctors and nurses tended to be positive about patient involvement and nurses were more willing to support patient involvement and to participate themselves if they were patients.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Developing a ‘critical’ approach to patient and public involvement in patient safety in the NHS: learning lessons from other parts of the public sector?

December 24, 2012

Source: Health Expectations  Vol/Iss  15/4 pp.424-432.

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Date of publication: December 2012

Publication type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Over the last 10 years there has been a significant drive within the NHS to develop greater patient and public involvement (PPI). In patient safety, the initiative to increase involvement has increasingly been seen as an important way of building a safety culture. This paper analyses some of the key underlying drivers for involvement in the wider context of health and social care and makes some suggestions on what lessons can be learned for developing the PPI agenda in patient safety.

Length of publication: 9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


A qualitative exploration of patients’ attitudes towards the ‘Participate Inform Notice Know’ (PINK) patient safety video

December 24, 2012

Source:  International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Advance access doi: 10.1093/intqhc/mzs073

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Date of publication:  November 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors looked at the PINK (‘Participate Inform Notice Know’) video, an educational tool designed to increase hospital patients’ involvement in patient safety activities. Interviews with patients from one hospital found that people responded well to the short video, that it raised their awareness about patient safety and encouraged them to be more involved in their hospital care. It was thought that the video could be improved by tailoring it more to the individual circumstances of patients and by including a wider range of content.

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The adult patient’s passport to safer use of insulin

May 28, 2011

Source: National Reporting and Learning Service, NPSA

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Date of publication: March 2011

Publication type: Alert

In a nutshell: This alert focusses on improving patient safety by giving the patient the ability to take a more active role in their treatment.  This includes the use of insulin.

Length of publication: 1 webpage