Positive deviance: a different approach to achieving patient safety

December 22, 2014

Source:  BMJ Quality & Safety 23/11 pp.880-3.

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Date of publication:  November 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: This article argues that a patient safety management system that aims to identify and spread good practice, rather than identify unsafe care and investigate its causes, is more effective in managing and improving patient safety. The positive approach promoted by the article involves following ‘positive deviance’. The article concludes that focusing on negativity sends the wrong message and that healthcare professionals would be better served by receiving positive messages and constructive praise.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Patient Safety Academy website goes live

May 28, 2014

Source:  Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences

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Date of publication:  April 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: This news page from the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences at the University of Oxford, discusses a new Patient Safety Academy website that has been established by a research group, the Quality, Reliability, Safety and Teamwork Unit (QRSTU). The QRSTU team set up the website with the aim of providing education and support to healthcare professionals in the application of human factors to their work settings to improve quality and safety. The website can be accessed at http://www.patientsafetyacademy.co.uk/

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Predictors of health care professionals’ attitudes towards involvement in safety-relevant behaviours

September 25, 2013

Source:  Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  August 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study examined factors that influence health professionals’ attitudes towards patient participation in patient safety activities. Doctors and nurses from four hospitals in England were surveyed about their attitudes towards patient involvement in two error scenarios regarding hand hygiene and medication safety. Professionals were more in favour of patients intervening about a medication error than about hand hygiene. If a professional hypothetically responded negatively to a patient when they pointed out a potential error, staff thought that this could have a negative effect on the patient-professional relationship. Doctors were less likely than nurses to think it was good for patients to intervene.

Length of Publication:  Unknown

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


NICE guidance supports use of a device to visualise the airway in emergencies and improve patient safety

August 29, 2013

Source:  National Institute for Health and Care Excellence

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Date of publication:  July 2013

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:  NICE has published guidance to support the use of a device to help health professionals keep patients’ airways open when unexpected problems occur during procedures. The guidance advises that Ambu aScope2 can help health professionals when there are unexpected difficulties in positioning a temporary tube to keep the airway open, and emergency action is needed to maintain the airway. A thin, single-use, flexible endoscope, Ambu aScope2 uses video camera technology to help health professionals see the windpipe clearly.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Interest grows in new approach to measuring patient safety

June 24, 2013

Source:  Nursing Times

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Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:

In an interview with the Nursing Times, the new national director for patient safety, Mike Durkin, has said that frontline nurses and healthcare professionals should have more responsibility for ensuring the services they provide are safe. He has taken up the role of director of patient safety in the chief nursing officer’s directorate at NHS England following the NHS reforms. Dr Durkin said all staff working in a healthcare environment should see themselves as healthcare professionals, whether they have clinical training or not, and take responsibility for making sure care is safe.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Errors as allies: error management training in health professions education.

February 25, 2013

Source:  BMJ Qual Saf doi:10.1136/bmjqs-2012-000945

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Date of publication:  January 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The authors look at approaches from organisational team training literature to outline how patient safety can be improved by health professions education. They state that health educators can improve training quality by intentionally encouraging errors during simulation-based team training. An innovative approach for delivering team training is defined.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient Involvement in Patient Safety: The Health-Care Professional’s Perspective.

January 30, 2013

Source: J Patient Safety  Vol/iss  8/4  pp.182-8

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Date of publication:  December 2012

Publication type: Journal article

In a nutshell: Health professionals views were examined by researchers regarding involving patients in safety initiatives. 40 doctors and 40 nurses from one hospital were surveyed. Doctors and nurses tended to be positive about patient involvement and nurses were more willing to support patient involvement and to participate themselves if they were patients.

Length of publication: 7 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.