Safety standards for invasive procedures: beware the implementation gap

March 23, 2016

Source:  BMJ 352:i1121

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2016

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Nick Sevdalis is professor of implementation science and patient safety at King’s College London.  In this editorial he offers advice regarding the implementation of the recent NHS England guideline National Safety Standards for Invasive Procedures (NatSSIPs).  

Length of publication:  2 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections overview

October 28, 2015

Source:  NICE

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Date of publicationAugust 2015

Publication type:  NICE Pathway

In a nutshell:  The NICE Pathway on the Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections overview was updated on 17 August 2015 to include the NICE pathway on antimicrobial stewardship.

Length of Publication:  7 pages


Development and measurement of perioperative patient safety indicators

March 25, 2015

Source:  British Journal of Anaesthesia [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  February 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Many hospitals are implementing evidence-based perioperative safety guidelines so as to improve patient safety. The authors of this study aimed to develop patient safety indicators. The RAND-modified Delphi method was used to develop a set of patient safety indicators based on the perioperative guidelines. A core group of experts systematically selected recommendations from the guidelines. An expert panel of representative professionals then appraised the recommendations against safety criteria, prioritised them and reached consensus about 11 patient safety indicators. There was great variation in guideline adherence between and within hospitals, identifying opportunities for improvement in the quality of perioperative care.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Guidelines for routine gastrostomy tube replacement in children

March 26, 2014

Source:  Nursing Children and Young People 25/10 pp. 22-25

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publicationDecember 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:   The safest method of inserting a gastrostomy in children that require full or supplemental enteral feeding for more than six weeks is by endoscopic placement. The device can be changed to a balloon, button or non-balloon type once a stoma tract has formed successfully following initial placement of a gastrostomy tube. Community nursing teams often support children with gastrostomies and their families. The National Nurses Nutrition Group, the Patient Safety Agency and manufacturers have produced guidance for the safe insertion and replacement of balloon and button gastrostomies, but standardised national guidelines are needed.

Length of Publication:  4 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


The implementation of nice guidance on venous thromboembolism risk assessment and prophylaxis: a before-after observational study to assess the impact on patient safety across four hospitals in England

June 24, 2013

Source:  BMC Health Services Research Vol 13 pp. 203

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Date of publication:  June 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  An international major health requirement is the prevention of Venous thromboembolism (VTE) to improve patient safety. In February 2010 NICE issued guidance on assessing patients for risk of VTE on admission to hospital, assessing patients for bleeding risk and evaluating the risks and benefits of prescribing VTE prophylaxis. This study aimed to evaluate the implementation of NICE guidance and its impact on patient safety. The documentation of risk assessment improved following the implementation of NICE guidance; however, it is uncertain whether this led to improved patient safety with respect to prescribing appropriate prophylaxis.

Length of Publication:  14 pages


Impact of a structured template and staff training on compliance and quality of clinical handover

December 3, 2012

Source:  International Journal of Surgery, vol/iss 10/9 pp.571-574

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Date of publication:  October 2012

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  In this article, researchers assessed whether the quality of clinical handover in hospital could be improved for junior doctors by using a standardised and structured handover template. A computerised template was developed in accordance with handover guidelines by the Royal College of Surgeons of England. The template helped to promote quality of care, improve compliance to agreed standards and protect patient safety.

Length of Publication:  4 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.

Acknowledgements:  The Heath Foundation


Best practice in the management of epidural analgesia in the hospital setting

January 28, 2011

Source: NHS Evidence Health Management

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Date of publication: November 2010

Publication type: Guidelines

In a nutshell: These guidelines look at best practice in the use of epidural analgesia within hospitals.  The main subjects focused on are continuous influsions, intermittent top-up injections and patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA).  They also look at the features of epidural pain management services.

Length of publication: 15 pages