‘How Safe is my Hospital’ site launched

July 30, 2014

Source:  EHealth Insider

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Date of publication:  June 2014

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell:   This news reports on a new section on NHS Choices which will include Trust compliance on ward staffing, incident reporting, pressure ulcers, falls and patient safety. The Department of Health has launched the site, which will enable the public to compare hospitals in England based on a number of safety indicators. The launch is part of the ‘Sign up to Safety’ campaign that aims to save up to 6000 lives over the next three years. The trusts will be ranked according to how openly they are reporting and will be rated as ‘good’, ‘acceptable’ or ‘poor’. As part of the campaign, Jeremy Hunt has also launched a new Safety Action for England team, made of senior clinicians, managers and patients.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Learning from the design and development of the NHS Safety Thermometer

July 30, 2014

Source:  International Journal of Quality in Health Care 26/3 pp. 287-297

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Date of publication:  June 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The NHS Safety Thermometer has been developed to measure the prevalence of harm from pressure ulcers, falls and urinary tract infections in people with catheters and venous thromboembolism on one day each month. It is for all NHS patients. The tool was developed during a learning collaborative between 161 organisations and tested over a 17 month period, with 73,651 patient entries. The researchers determined that it is possible to obtain national data using a standardised tool completed by site coordinators. It is important that data collectors are well trained.

Length of Publication:  11 pages


Implementing the Safety Thermometer tool in one NHS trust

May 28, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 13-26 23/5 pp. 268-72

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Date of publication:  March 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  The NHS in England introduced the NHS Safety Thermometer to address measurement of patient safety using the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme. This article discusses the CQUIN scheme and the thinking behind the focus on pressure ulcers, falls in care, catheter use and urinary tract infection, and venous thromboembolism. The implementation of the scheme in a large NHS foundation trust is described together with its effect within the authors’ organisation on harm-free care for their patients.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Health and safety in the NHS

April 30, 2014

Source:  British Journal of Nursing 23/2 pp112-113

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Date of publication:  January-February 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Each year, accidents at work cost the NHS a large amount of money. The most common cause of claim for compensation faced by the NHS is for accidents that are due to avoidable slips and falls. In the first of a series, this article on health and safety law sets out the duties imposed on NHS organisations and their employees.

Length of Publication:  2 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


How can we keep patients with dementia safe in our acute hospitals? A review of challenges and solutions

November 27, 2013

Source:  Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine vol/iss 106/9, pp. 355-61

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Date of publication:  September 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This review examined the medical literature over the last ten years for aspects of patient safety related to patients with dementia. Patients with dementia suffer frequent adverse events in hospital that result in falls, delirium and loss of function which can lead to increased length of stay and higher levels of mortality. Inadequate assessment and treatment, discrimination, low staff levels and lack of staff training can add to the situation. The authors say that there is no one solution, but a multifactorial, multilevel approach is needed at seven levels of care – patient, task, staff, team, environment, organisation and institution.

Length of Publication:  7 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Patient safety during assistant propelled wheelchair transfers: the effect of the seat cushion on risk of falling

May 29, 2013

Source:  Assist Technol. Vol/iss 25/1 pp. 1-8.

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Date of publication:  Spring 2013

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article is a report of a study of the effect of the seat cushion on risk of falling from a wheelchair. Different types of seat cushion were studied. The findings can contribute to the assessment of risk and care planning of non-ambulatory wheelchair users.

Length of Publication:  8 pages

Some important notes:  Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library.


Improving patient safety

December 3, 2012

Source: Worcester News

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Date of publication: November 2012

Publication type: News item

In a nutshell: A team has been set up at Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust to improve patient safety by eliminating blood clots, falls, bed sores and urinary catheter infections. The safe care team, launched in August, has been working across county hospitals, including Worcester. The scheme has already had some successes including Ward 11 at the Alexandra Hospital, Redditch, where there have now been 130 days without a patient developing a pressure ulcer.

Length of publication: 1 web page