An evaluation of the impact of the key information summary on GPs and out-of-hours clinicians in NHS Scotland

September 30, 2015

Source:  Scottish Medical Journal 60/3 pp. 126-31.

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Date of publication:  August 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Implemented during 2013, key information summary is one of the first national shared electronic patient records. It enables GPs to share clinical information with unscheduled care providers, including out-of-hours. This evaluation identified the impact of key information summary on healthcare services. The vast majority of responses showed that key information summary enhances patient safety, improves clinical management, reduces hospital admissions, empowers clinicians, aids communication across services and enables decisions to be responsive to patients’ needs. Out-of-hours clinicians would like more key information summaries, all well-completed and including social care information.

Length of Publication:  6 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Learning to ensure patient safety in clinical settings: comparing Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions

August 26, 2015

Source:  Journal of Clinical Nursing [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication:  July 2015

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study aimed to explore and compare Finnish and British nursing students’ perceptions of their learning about patient safety in clinical settings. The participants were final year preregistration nursing students from two universities in Finland and two in England. The Finnish nursing students had significantly more critical perceptions on their learning about patient safety in clinical settings than the British students. Fewer Finnish students had practiced reporting of incidents in clinical settings compared to British students. Nursing students appear to want more learning opportunities related to patient safety compared to the reality in clinical settings.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Glasgow develops world’s only patient safety programme specifically for mental health

April 29, 2015

Source:  The Herald Scotland

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Date of publicationMarch 2015

Publication type:  News item

In a nutshell: After being recognised for improving patient care, the world’s only national safety programme specifically designed for mental health has been rolled out to 14 wards across NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde. The mental health arm of the Scottish Patient Safety Programme has seen more patient involvement in decision-making, work on medication safety, wider use of safety briefings at the beginning of shifts, and less use of restraint.

Length of Publication:  1 web page


Errors in the management of cardiac arrests: An observational study of patient safety incidents in England

January 28, 2015

Source:  Resuscitation 85/12 pp.1759–1763

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Date of publication:  December 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell: This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the types of error that occur during the management of cardiac arrests that lead to a death. The reviewers identified a main shortfall in the management of each cardiac arrest and this resulted in 12 different factors being documented. These were then grouped into four themes: miscommunication involving crash number, shortfalls in staff attending the arrest, equipment deficits, and poor application of knowledge and skills. No firm conclusion could be drawn about how many deaths would have been averted if the emergency had been managed to a high standard.

Length of Publication:  5 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Online patient safety education programme for junior doctors: is it worthwhile?

December 22, 2014

Source:  Irish Journal of Medical Science Epub ahead of print

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Date of publication:  November 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This study looked at online learning about patient safety for junior doctors in Ireland and asked if it is valuable. The participating doctors completed a baseline survey and a follow-up survey. The online initiative resulted in immediate improvements in self-reported knowledge such as knowing when and how to complete incident forms and disclosing errors to patients, and in attitudes towards error reporting. The interactive features were the most positive elements of the programme. The authors conclude that online training about medical errors improved junior doctors self-rated knowledge, attitudes and skills in Ireland.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Mentorship for newly appointed physicians: a strategy for enhancing patient safety?

November 26, 2014

Source:  Journal of Patient Safety 10/3 pp. 59-67.

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Date of publication:  September 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  Health-care services are applying mentorship in their settings, learning from business and industry where it is a popular innovation. This article looks at the concept of mentorship for newly appointed physicians in their first substantive senior post and in particular at its deployment to enhance patient safety. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with Medical Directors, Deputy Medical Directors and Clinical Directors from 9 acute NHS Trusts in the Yorkshire and Humber region in the north of England. A number of beneficial outcomes were found, including greater personal and professional support, organisational commitment, and general well-being. Providing newly appointed senior physicians with support through mentorship was considered to enhance the safety of patient care.

Length of Publication:  9 pages

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library


Nurses’ shift length and overtime working in 12 European countries: the association with perceived quality of care and patient safety

October 29, 2014

Source:  Medical Care 52/ 11 pp.975-81.

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Date of publication:  September 2014

Publication type:  Journal article

In a nutshell:  This article aimed to describe shift patterns of European nurses and to investigate whether shift length and working overtime is associated with nurse-reported care quality, safety, and care left undone. The authors concluded that European registered nurses working shifts of ≥12 hours and those working overtime reported lower quality and safety and more care left undone. Any policies to adopt a 12-hour nursing shift pattern should proceed with caution. Use of overtime working to help with staffing shortages or increase flexibility also incurs additional risk to quality.

Length of Publication:  1 web page

Some important notes: Please contact your local NHS Library for the full text of the article. Follow this link to find your local NHS Library